Christianity

The explanation that covers all the facts: A miracle occurred

I know it sounds strange to our ears in 2018. Many modern people believe miracles can't happen, mostly because they've never seen one. But belief in miracles isn't all that of an antiquated idea. 80% of Americans according to some polls believe in miracles. 62% of American Pentecostal Christians say they have witnessed or personally experienced divine healing, according to the Pew Forum.

I would include myself in that number. I personally have seen many things I can't explain as happening simply by natural means. I've had a son whose heart had a valve that would not close and the doctors feared they may have had to operate. He was healed, I believe, in response to prayer. In my own church, I've seen people miraculously healed from serious heart conditions, serious vision problems and mothers whom doctors said were unable to have children have the children they desired and prayed for. Watch the below video to hear for yourself:

Miracles today and then

Either these people are deceived or are seeking to deceive. I think it's hard to argue that either is the case. That they happened in response to prayer and faith in Christ says something. It indicates He is still doing the same things the Gospels claim He was doing 2,000 years ago.  And we've seen that from the very outset of the church, miracles were things that these eyewitnesses believed were possible through faith in Jesus.

Paul mentions in passing in his letters to the churches about the miracles he performed in the name of Jesus. We know he suffered dearly for what he believed, so he's not a charlatan. Most of Paul’s letters were written from prison. And these things must have had substance because he spoke of them as if the whole church knew of them. And these were not like some modern churches today that are expecting miracles. Paul speaks as if many of them came to believe not based on merely his preaching, but the miracles that God worked through him. (See Romans 15:19, 1 Corinthians 2:4, 2 Corinthians 12:12,  Galatians 3:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:5)  The Book of Acts also reports miraculous healings continuing through the apostles after Jesus ascended to heaven. (Acts 3:1-6, Acts 9:33-34, Acts 14:7-9, Acts 19:11-12, Acts 20:9-12, Acts 28:7-9, for just a few examples.) These things are difficult to simply explain away.

But what if I've never seen a miracle?

We ought to measure the testimony of the individuals who claim to have encountered a miracle and not dismiss it because we weren't personally there. It would be unwise for a Nigerian person to deny that snow existed in light of the fact that he had never observed it in his city.

We spend much of our lives accepting the testimony of other individuals about events or facts that we can't personally check. If a particular claim appears to be unusual or extraordinary, that ought to obviously make us wary before accepting it, yet in the event that the evidence is solid, then we are obliged to take it seriously.

C.S. Lewis

Scholars Say

Check your bias

"Those who assume that miracles cannot happen are merely wasting their time by looking into the texts: we know in advance what results they will find for they have begun by begging the question." 

- C.S. Lewis, former atheist turned Christian. Novelist, academic and literary critic. Best known for his children's fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. Held academic positions at both Oxford University and Cambridge University.