How Mentions of Money in Matthew’s Gospel Confirm Matthean Authorship

The Synoptics tell us that Matthew was a tax-collector by trade. So if his version of the Jesus story shows an unusual degree of interest in financial matters, we’re given a solid reason to think that the apostle is the genuine author. It wouldn’t likely be some later, anonymous non-eyewitnesses like the skeptical critics say.  As it turns out, this is precisely what we find to be the case. Matthew talks about moola more than any other Gospel writer, and it isn’t even close. When we add up the references to money in the Synoptics, here’s what we get:  Matthew – 44 Mark – 6 Luke -22 Luke’s total includes nine references in one parable … Read more

Was Jesus Being Racist and Harsh When He Told the Woman at the Well That the Samaritans Didn’t Know Who They Worshiped?

There are some wonderful spiritual lessons in John’s story about the Woman at the Well. We learn that salvation comes to those who recognize their spiritual thirst. We discover that Jesus is the source of this salvation and that only he can answer our spiritual needs. And it doesn’t matter if we’ve marred our own lives with sin, Jesus is willing to accept anyone.  But some might complain that Jesus’ words to the Samaritan woman were too harsh. They smack with religious and racial superiority. Here are the passages in question:  “Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where … Read more

Podcast: Did the Gospel Writers Get Historical Facts Right?

Skeptics say that the Gospel writers were reporting events from far away long after the events. Therefore, they bungle their facts when it comes to the history of their time and they can’t be relied upon. Here I demonstrate that the Gospel writers did, in fact, know their contemporary history extensively. An error made on my part in the video. I said the Jews worship on Sinai, which would be in Egypt! It’s supposed to be the Mount of Olives. 🤦‍♂️ Erik ManningErik is a Reasonable Faith Chapter Director located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He’s a former freelance baseball writer and the co-owner of a vintage and handmade decor business with his wife, Dawn. He … Read more

Video: The Names of the 12: Evidence That the Gospel Writers Knew Their Stuff

Do Matthew and Luke contradict each other when it comes to the names of the Twelve Apostles? Some skeptics say yes, but there’s actually a very plausible solution that’s rooted in the historical data we have about what people were named during Jesus’ time. And as it turns out, the names actually provide good evidence that the Gospels were based on eyewitness testimony. If you’re more of a podcast person, You can listen and Subscribe here: References: Can We Trust the Gospels?, Peter J Williams, https://amzn.to/2QHP8s5 Jesus and the Eyewitnesses, Richard Bauckham https://amzn.to/3a2J4Cr Erik ManningErik is a Reasonable Faith Chapter Director located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He’s a former freelance baseball writer and the co-owner … Read more

New Video: Are the Gospels Really Anonymous?

I’d like to introduce you to my new YouTube channel. It’s called Sunday School Apologetics. I’m excited about this new channel! The idea behind it is to do a Sunday School type of curriculum covering various apologetic topics. The first series is going to be on the historical reliability of the Gospels. Today we start with the genuineness of the Gospels. Were they really written by the traditional authors? Skeptics like Bart Ehrman say that the Gospels were anonymously written and the traditional authors like Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John were names added long after the disciples were dead. But is this theory right? Here I defend the traditional authorship of the gospels and answer … Read more

Podcast Episode 7 – The Early Dating of the Gospels

Early Dating of the Gospels

Skeptical scholars date the Gospels 40-60 years after the death of Jesus. If that’s the case, can they be reliable sources if they are so late after the events? As it turns out, there’s one main reason skeptics date the Gospels late, and it isn’t a very good reason. There are 13 different lines of evidence to think the Gospels were written well before 65 AD that I lay out in this show. References: 84 Reasons Why We Know Luke Was a Travelling Companion of Paul – isjesusalive.com. Is Bart Ehrman Right When He Says Half of Paul’s Letters are Forgeries? – CapturingChristianity.com The Reliability of Acts (Video) – Dr. Tim McGrew How We Know … Read more

13 Good Historical Reasons For The Early Dating of The Gospels

Skeptics like Bart Ehrman will use Apollonius of Tyana as a challenge to Jesus’ uniqueness. Apollonius lived in the first century. His birth was supernatural. He also performed miracles and appeared to people after his death. Sounds familiar, right? Critics will then conclude that the story of Jesus isn’t special. Apologists will then retort that the Apollonius’ biography was written long after his death. It isn’t until about 100 years later that Philostratus wrote his biography. Therefore, the story we have about his life couldn’t be based on eyewitness testimony. But the Gospels are based on the accounts of witnesses.  And this is where critics will say “Oh really? The Gospels came long after Jesus’ … Read more

Episode 6: the Mirror or the Mask? An Interview With Dr. Lydia McGrew

In my first ever podcast interview, I interview scholar Dr. Lydia McGrew regarding her upcoming book Liberating the Gospels from Literary Devices, which comes up December 10th and can be pre-ordered at Amazon.com. The book has been positively reviewed by noted Christian scholars like Peter J. Williams, JP Moreland, and Craig Blomberg. She is a widely published analytic philosopher, specializing in formal and classical theory of knowledge, testimony, and the philosophy of religion. She received her Ph.D. in English from Vanderbilt University in 1995. She is the author of the widely acclaimed Hidden in Plain View: Undesigned Coincidences in the Gospels and Acts (DeWard, 2017), which defends the reliability of the New Testament using a long-neglected argument from … Read more

Unexpected Evidence for the Gospels’ Truth From the Names of the People in Them

The late Christopher Hitchens said, “The New Testament is a work of crude carpentry, hammered together long after its purported events, and full of improvised attempts to make things come out right.” One example of this alleged makeshift handiwork is the names of the Twelve. If the gospel writers can’t get the names of Jesus’ disciples straight, how can we trust them with other details?  On the face of it, it looks like Matthew and Luke contradict: Matthew 10:2-4: “The names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James the son of Alphaeus, … Read more

Undesigned coincidences in the gospels: Surprising evidence for Jesus’ feeding of the 5000

The feeding of the 5000 is one of Jesus’ most popular miracles. If you grew up in church, you probably saw it depicted on many a flannel graph. You know the story: Jesus was in a deserted place where large crowds were hanging on his every word. When it started to get late, Jesus’ disciples asked him to disperse the gathering to the surrounding villages so they could grab a bite to eat. Rather than sending them home, Jesus took five loaves and two fish and fed the multitude. The young lad who shared his food became famous that day and was sent home with 12 baskets full of leftovers.  Critics of the Bible tend … Read more

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